Homegoing: a Review

Gyasi really showcases her writing capabilities in Homegoing. Readers begin with two sisters and how their paths diverge: one becoming sold into slavery and shipped off to America, and the other remaining within Ghana. From there, each chapter introduces someone new who is related to the two sisters. And from there readers explore an entire line of ancestry.

The writing style is beautiful and the story in its entirety flows very well. Each chapter basically functions as a short story, but the tie-ins are very prominent so it helps to have that back-end knowledge. While for me it was hard getting into all of the chapters since I would form connections with other characters, it was still rewarding. Gyasi’s message really hit home with me.

Nearing the end of the book I stopped and it just hit me. It hit me like a ton of bricks. I realized suddenly that while now it’s generally unacceptable to sell people into slavery and there’s no breaking up of families in that regard, that families today suffer so much because the likelihood of being reunited with unknown family members is highly impossible. You might have family still in Ghana while the other half of your family is in the States and you might never know it. What an intense, scary, and tremendously terrible feeling! Gyasi does very well to point this out and to showcase the different struggles, particularly the black experience in America.

The Ghana lore from the Asante tribe is wonderful and moving. It also put things in perspective for me as I was already familiar with the spider god, Anasi thanks to the novel by Gaiman, Anasi Boys. But knowing the different traditions within a tribe and how slavery and white America has taken away that unique-ness of African-Americans is very sad. One quote sums it up from the book: “black is just black.” It’s very similar treatment America gives their own indigenous community with the blanket term of Native American without recognizing the different tribes. Seems to be a theme.

Some of my favorite quotes include:
“Weakness is treating someone as though they belong to you. Strength is knowing that everyone belongs to themselves.”

“You cannot stick a knife in a goat and then say, Now I will remove my knife slowly, so let things be easy and clean, let there be no mess. There will always be blood.”

“The British were no longer selling slaves to America, but slavery had not ended, and his father did not seem to think that it would end. They would just trade one type of shackles for another, trade physical ones that wrapped around wrists and ankles for the invisible ones that wrapped around the mind.”

“The British had no intention of leaving Africa, even once the slave trade ended. They owned the Castle, and, though they had yet to speak it aloud, they intended to own the land as well.”

“The white man’s god is just like the white man. He thinks he is the only god, just like the white man thinks he is the only man.”

“The white man told us he was the way, and we said yes, but when has the white man ever told us something was good for us and that thing was really good? They say you are an African witch, and so what? So what? Who told them what a witch was?”

“Forgiveness, they shouted, all the while committing their wrongs. When he was younger, Yaw wondered why they did not preach that the people should avoid wrongdoing altogether. Forgiveness was an act done after the fact, a piece of the bad deed’s future. And if you point the people’s eye to the future, they might not see what is being done to hurt them in the present.”

5/5 from me – a very insightful and impacting novel with a wonderful story!

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