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Truly Madly Guilty Review

Titl9781743534915e: Truly Madly Guilty
Author: Liane Moriarty
Genre: Fiction
Country: Australia
Rating: 2/5

Summary: Clementine and Erika have been friends since childhood and continue to keep one another in their lives. Erika is the godmother of Clementine’s children, even. But one day when they get invited to Erika’s neighbor’s barbecue, something goes terribly wrong that shapes three families for the rest of their lives. Complete with secrets, dysfunctional families, resentment, and drama, Truly Madly Guilty dives into the ugly and the beautiful of the human condition.

My Reaction: Truly Madly Guilty begins during Clementine’s presentation about what happened at the barbecue through Erika’s perspective. Readers are left in the dark as to what actually happened at the life-altering barbecue until ~60% into the book. Moriarty does not spare any details from the mundane lifestyles of both Clementine and Erika. The perspectives alter in each chapter although the book is written in third person limited.

The mystery of what happened at the barbecue is supposed to fuel the reader’s imagination and interest into the novel, but unfortunately, Moriarty’s need for describing every little detail of every little thing we do in life outweighs the excitement of anticipation. We are left in the dark grappling for: what the hell happened? It’s frustrating and I often wanted to give up on the book.

When it gets to the last 40% of the novel, the pace picks up very nicely. Suddenly readers can spiral into the drama of what happened that day and how / why it changed all three families involved. Compared to the beginning of the novel, the ending is like finally jumping off a plane to skydive while the beginning is like the anticipation but mostly dread of actually getting to the jumping part.

It is the end that saved this book from a 1/5 rating. Moriarty does do very well on describing the human condition and the human psyche but she does it in such a dull, mundane way that I struggled in caring. I did enjoy some of the backstories, mostly Erika’s, but it isn’t a saving grace for the novel by any means.

Unfortunately there were no quotes I liked well enough to highlight and I do not believe this would by any means qualify for literary fiction. There is nothing very insightful that Moriarty gives me as a reader.

The author also has a penchant to tie everything together with a nice little bow on top, and while it’s generally nice that author’s can tie things in together, it’s on the rather dull/obvious side of things. For instance, it’s raining throughout the entire novel until one day it clears up and the sun is out. The metaphor is tiring and trite at best. The other tie-ins are eye rolling ones that aren’t complex at all. And then there are some things, like Clementine’s mother’s resolve at the day of the barbecue that never come to light. There are many things left unsaid or unfinished in the novel.

By the very end things return to the mundane and there were probably about 100 pages of actual good, exciting writing. Not that Moriarty is a bad writer by any means, her prose is generally good by qualifications, but it’s boring and not insightful. But this book could have easily lost 200-300 pages and it would have been a good novella.

Trigger Warnings Review

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Title: Trigger Warnings
Author: Neil Gaiman
Genre: Fiction > Short Story / Poetry Collection
Country: England
Rating: 1/5

Summary: Gaiman writes on several different subject matters. The short stories often deal with the fantastical, including fairy tale spinoffs, a Doctor Who short story, and a short story continuation of American Gods following the main protagonist Shadow. The stories are meant to be disturbing and some of them even include tentacled monsters or faceless creatures.

My Reaction: A waste of time. I always love Gaiman’s ideas and I’ve read a couple of his books, but I can never get behind his writing style. It seems trite and elementary most of the time. The title is very misleading and Gaiman includes in his introduction his thoughts on trigger warnings, which in my opinion, shows that he doesn’t understand what TWs are for. In any case, there is hardly anything that could use a trigger warning. He also includes a synopsis of each short story before the stories begin which screams: I don’t trust my readers!

There is no short story that I can say that I remotely enjoyed. The Doctor Who short story is all right, but I found it annoying that Gaiman borrows so heavily from what is already on television. Most of the short stories end abruptly without much explanation which is supposed to add to the air of “disturbances” but it falls short. The characters are hardly worth remembering. I remember Shadow from American Gods, but that’s because I’d already read the novel.

Gaiman has good ideas but his overall ability to achieve a writing style that compliments his genius is lost. I had to really push my way through this book. There were no memorable quotes, probably the best part of the collection was the preface. There were some laughable quotes that, in my opinion, showcase bad writing, such as: “Her ship’s deck would be painted red, to mask the blood in battle.” If Gaiman trusted his readers any, he could easily omit “to mask the blood in battle.” It’s cliche, readers will get your meaning Gaiman, believe me!

I believe this seals the deal on me and Gaiman: we will never be. I truly looked forward to this collection because I love his mind, but … it didn’t pan out.

The Girl with Seven Names: Review

9780007554867_s260x420Title: The Girl with Seven Names
Author: Hyeonseo Lee
Genre: Autobiography
Country: North Korea
Rating: 3/5

Hyeonseo Lee gives readers a glimpse into her life. Born and raised in North Korea, she introduces the outside world to the abuse of her government. Always paranoid and suspicious of others, North Korean members of society must always be vigilant in making sure that they are consistently loyal to the government. Every neighbor is a spy. Even the government officials are on the prowl wanting to catch anyone in a lie or in a position where they are demoted in social status.

In order to survive, many citizens resort to smuggling in goods from China or Japan in order to sell on black markets in North Korea. While frowned upon, most smugglers have money to ensure their safety from the government via bribes. By all accounts, Lee’s position in North Korea is very privileged. She touches on the Great Famine of the 1990’s and how that doesn’t directly affect her food source, but how it affects those less fortunate. Many people die and they die in the public view, and the tragedy of a government that doesn’t respond to the suffering of their people.

Eventually, Lee escapes North Korea and has to endure China’s policies on refugees from NK, which aren’t friendly. She must survive by hiding constantly. Luckily she has assistance but it doesn’t diminish how difficult it is to truly escape NK.

In escaping, she experiences guilt in leaving her family behind. Nevertheless, the human will proves resilient and she learns how to live as best she can where she is.

Lee’s story is dramatic and very lucky. She finds help in unexpected places more than once. It also calls into question a country’s response to someone fleeing from an abusive country/government. Is it moral to turn someone away, to return them back to the dystopian government? Even China expresses remorse for their past policies. Lee navigates this question gracefully but does not shy away from the details that caused her life havoc.

While I learned a lot about how North Korea operates, the reason I give this book a 3 is for the writing style. It’s very straightforward, very bland at some points. Although it’s a page turner, certain things become trite, such as the habit of ending a chapter with something like, “I would soon realize things could get worse.” It happens so often that I often scoffed at the writing. And there are a few threads left untied, which happens, but the book ends rather abruptly.

I appreciate this book in its entirety, however, and recommend it to readers curious about North Korea. I believe we should not make fun of NK based on their success rate of keeping their citizens oppressed. This book made me realize that the people of other countries must make laws to help refugees and people in need; while there may be international laws that aide people like Lee now, we must make sure as global citizens to not let our own rulers close the door to safety. NK is a serious human rights issue and Lee’s account sheds light to that.

A Tale for the Time Being: Review

Ozeki writes through the lens of her 16-year-old protagonist and her family’s recent relocation back to Japan. Nao is a very straightforward but comical narrator; somehow Ozeki pulls off writing about very triggering topics such as suicide in a serious but “lighthearted” manner. The first half of the book is very easy to read; it’s very fast paced and keeps you alert. The second half is just as good but the writing style turns much darker very fast. I even had to put the book down a couple of times just to refocus myself.

This story is about cruelty. Cruelty of a world pushing you to the brink of you wanting to exist; cruelty of people who refuse to accept you; cruelty of corporations and their greed by refusing to respect your hesitancy in gaining profits through war. It’s about people pushing back from the status quo that is accepting war, accepting torture, accepting executions, etc. And in a way, this story is very much about life. There are several characters that interweave through time and they all respect life so much but yet nearly all face the choice of having to or wanting to kill themselves.

It is very easy to connect with Nao; her narration style is very informal and engaging. Anyone who’s gone through high school knows how cruel other students can be to one another and how important it is to reject bullying. It’s very heartbreaking to see how much her life is ruined because of her classmates and her continual struggle to pull herself back to the surface. Nao isn’t a perfect character and I really appreciate how Ozeki characterizes her callousness toward her father’s troubles. Bullying is a circle and the bullied can also create cruelty unto others.

Ozeki submerges the reader in Japanese culture. If you have the Kindle version as I do, the links to the notes come in very handy and I suggest that you read this book in its entirety which includes the appendix. The novel also submerges the reader in Zen Buddhism which I believe helps keep the novel’s peace. There are very dark times but I began to rely on some breathing techniques mentioned in the book and found it easier to read during the second half.

This book will probably be triggering; Ozeki does not shy away from the harsh reality of the world which entails: sexual assault, rape, suicide, war, and genocide. At the end of the day you realize how cruel the world actually is, how cruel people can be (which is an astonishing amount). And then you must make a decision on how you respond to the cruelty around you.

A Tale for the Time Being has some fantastic quotes. Some of my favorite are:
“What is the half-life of information?”

“During the physical examination in October, the recruiting officer ordered us to “switch off our hearts and minds completely.” He instructed us to cut off our love and sever our attachment with our family and blood relations because from now on we were soldiers and our loyalty must lie solely with our Emperor and our homeland of Japan. I remember listening to this and thinking that I could never comply, but I was wrong. In trying to stop your tears, I was already obeying the officer’s command to the letter, not out of patriotic allegiance, but out of cowardice, in order not to feel the pain of my own heart, breaking.”

“Think about it. Where do words come from? They come from the dead. We inherit them. Borrow them. Use them for a time to bring the dead to life.”

“Killing people should not be so much fun.”

“If you start snapping your fingers now and continue snapping 98,463,077 times without stopping, the sun will rise and the sun will set, and the sky will grow dark and the night will deepen, and everyone will sleep while you are still snapping, until finally, sometime after daybreak, when you finish up your 98,463,077th snap, you will experience the truly intimate awareness of knowing exactly how you spent every single moment of a single day of your life.”

A wonderful book and a must-read. 5/5